A commitment to sports in present days Sierra Leone…

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By: Sheku Putka Kamara

In our September publication of our Expo Magazine, I looked into an article that touched on fans’ love for football and how the sport has unified and is still unifying stakeholders. I intend to build on such gains and delve further into a commitment into the very discipline that many people adore. When perspectives of this nature are put together, it is not to say that there are no issues and or vices, but the urge to get things done and establish progress tend to outshine the negativities.

Globally, billions go into sports. Even here, those millions are now very visible even if not physically. That is a way to suggest that sporting disciplines and investments plus funds go hand in hand.  Sierra Leone has had its share of successes and challenges in the sporting sector. It is not a secret that football is by far the most popular sport, but that is not to suggest that other sporting disciplines are not existing. For example, volleyball, basketball, athletics are all forms of sport that have tasted and are still tasting successes. This goes to show that even where we do not have it all, we have been making progress in our own little ways.

Nicol and Sesay (2002) discussed that ‘Sierra Leoneans are avid football (soccer) fans, and prior to the civil war, the country boasted dozens of amateur and semi-professional squads that vied for national honours. Baseball and basketball are also popular, and several Sierra Leone-born athletes play professionally outside the country.’ They continued that ‘Intramural competition in all these sports was brought to a standstill during the civil war. In 1996, the national football squad reached the final rounds of the African Nations’ Cup after barely avoiding forfeiture because of a lack of travel funds. In 1999, the team had to surrender its play-off spot in the 2000 African Nations’ Cup because it could not safely travel to neighbouring Guinea to play in a qualifying match.

After the end of the civil war, efforts were made to reestablish the national football program in the country.’ So, even history has it that we have come a long way. In fact, there are perspectives that hold the view that much of what we could boast of today could be traced as far back.

In present day Sierra Leone, much may not have changed, but we may as well have a few pointers as explained by David Turner, a young sports’ administrator in Freetown who serves as head of media for the Western Area Football Association (WAFA). To him, the ‘stable peace among football stakeholders’ could be regarded as a major success story. He said that from ‘2013 to 2021, there was several rancour between and among the football family under the Madam Isha Johansen leadership, but that since Thomas Daddy Brima took over, ‘he has brought sanity within the game,’ Turner said. He added that in international competitions, youth football competitions across the various categories have been organized by the Football Association. Sierra Leone male and female teams have participated in FIFA and CAF Competitions. The construction of Artificial Turf in Freetown, Lungi and Bo is another laudable venture. When completed, this project will aid in boosting the sector and equally create an opportunity for young and aspiring sportsmen to do more and even better. Again, the playing of the SL Premier League is another virtue. We all know that football is serious business and so if we are able to make some of these things happen, we deserve a tap on the back.

Football is that game that has brought together divergent views and a range of persons. In summary, they all speak with one voice. A man will leave Calaba Town, East Freetown to relax at the Parade Field to view a premier league match, just as how a sport-loving fan will leave Lumley, West Freetown, to go to the BrimaAtouga mini stadium to witness a premier league encounter. That is how much the game has brought people to go and so it is worth noting that we all should do that which is to be done to make the game bigger and better.

Like how I touched on fans’ love in my previous article, the adoration that comes with and for the players in the game of football is sometimes unexplainable. Observation will guarantee that people are doing these things ‘for the love of the game.’

Turner also touched on the training of Licence B coaches and the refreshers’ course for Referees. He also said that the fact that the football sector is currently implementing the FIFA connect programs which will enable local teams to avoid illegal transfer of players is another plus. Mark you, this has been an aged old problem.

So, solving same would be prudent. With all of these opportunities for growth and what have you, there are challenges. David said that the ‘Lack of Branding and Marketing Opportunities by premier league clubs, Poor referees’ officiatingand Lack of trained and experienced football administrators’ are some of the challenges. This is so explainable even without adding a few other lines. This calls for more investment in the sector. It means that we all have to do more.

Again, efforts have to be made to recruit the right persons. It matters!  Like I would always note and state, we do not have it all. We still have a long way to go, but we are to be mindful that there are little

Things that we all could do. We should equally be hopeful that the processes have to be trusted and that some things are actually gradual.

With those traits in mind, there is nothing we cannot accomplish. It’s all about the mindset. It’s about the belief that things are doable and achievable. When we get that right, all other things may fall just in place, but if we are to miss the targets in those earlier stages, all other things may just not work correctly. Football and sports are big and huge globally.
Let’s therefore make do with what we have and see that we improve on our sectors as we get along…

By: Sheku Putka Kamara

In our September publication of our Expo Magazine, I looked into an article that touched on fans’ love for football and how the sport has unified and is still unifying stakeholders. I intend to build on such gains and delve further into a commitment into the very discipline that many people adore. When perspectives of this nature are put together, it is not to say that there are no issues and or vices, but the urge to get things done and establish progress tend to outshine the negativities.

Globally, billions go into sports. Even here, those millions are now very visible even if not physically. That is a way to suggest that sporting disciplines and investments plus funds go hand in hand.  Sierra Leone has had its share of successes and challenges in the sporting sector. It is not a secret that football is by far the most popular sport, but that is not to suggest that other sporting disciplines are not existing. For example, volleyball, basketball, athletics are all forms of sport that have tasted and are still tasting successes. This goes to show that even where we do not have it all, we have been making progress in our own little ways.

Nicol and Sesay (2002) discussed that ‘Sierra Leoneans are avid football (soccer) fans, and prior to the civil war, the country boasted dozens of amateur and semi-professional squads that vied for national honours. Baseball and basketball are also popular, and several Sierra Leone-born athletes play professionally outside the country.’ They continued that ‘Intramural competition in all these sports was brought to a standstill during the civil war. In 1996, the national football squad reached the final rounds of the African Nations’ Cup after barely avoiding forfeiture because of a lack of travel funds. In 1999, the team had to surrender its play-off spot in the 2000 African Nations’ Cup because it could not safely travel to neighbouring Guinea to play in a qualifying match.

After the end of the civil war, efforts were made to reestablish the national football program in the country.’ So, even history has it that we have come a long way. In fact, there are perspectives that hold the view that much of what we could boast of today could be traced as far back.

In present day Sierra Leone, much may not have changed, but we may as well have a few pointers as explained by David Turner, a young sports’ administrator in Freetown who serves as head of media for the Western Area Football Association (WAFA). To him, the ‘stable peace among football stakeholders’ could be regarded as a major success story. He said that from ‘2013 to 2021, there was several rancour between and among the football family under the Madam Isha Johansen leadership, but that since Thomas Daddy Brima took over, ‘he has brought sanity within the game,’ Turner said. He added that in international competitions, youth football competitions across the various categories have been organized by the Football Association. Sierra Leone male and female teams have participated in FIFA and CAF Competitions. The construction of Artificial Turf in Freetown, Lungi and Bo is another laudable venture. When completed, this project will aid in boosting the sector and equally create an opportunity for young and aspiring sportsmen to do more and even better. Again, the playing of the SL Premier League is another virtue. We all know that football is serious business and so if we are able to make some of these things happen, we deserve a tap on the back.

Football is that game that has brought together divergent views and a range of persons. In summary, they all speak with one voice. A man will leave Calaba Town, East Freetown to relax at the Parade Field to view a premier league match, just as how a sport-loving fan will leave Lumley, West Freetown, to go to the BrimaAtouga mini stadium to witness a premier league encounter. That is how much the game has brought people to go and so it is worth noting that we all should do that which is to be done to make the game bigger and better.

Like how I touched on fans’ love in my previous article, the adoration that comes with and for the players in the game of football is sometimes unexplainable. Observation will guarantee that people are doing these things ‘for the love of the game.’

Turner also touched on the training of Licence B coaches and the refreshers’ course for Referees. He also said that the fact that the football sector is currently implementing the FIFA connect programs which will enable local teams to avoid illegal transfer of players is another plus. Mark you, this has been an aged old problem.

So, solving same would be prudent. With all of these opportunities for growth and what have you, there are challenges. David said that the ‘Lack of Branding and Marketing Opportunities by premier league clubs, Poor referees’ officiatingand Lack of trained and experienced football administrators’ are some of the challenges. This is so explainable even without adding a few other lines. This calls for more investment in the sector. It means that we all have to do more.

Again, efforts have to be made to recruit the right persons. It matters!  Like I would always note and state, we do not have it all. We still have a long way to go, but we are to be mindful that there are little

Things that we all could do. We should equally be hopeful that the processes have to be trusted and that some things are actually gradual.

With those traits in mind, there is nothing we cannot accomplish. It’s all about the mindset. It’s about the belief that things are doable and achievable. When we get that right, all other things may fall just in place, but if we are to miss the targets in those earlier stages, all other things may just not work correctly. Football and sports are big and huge globally.

Let’s therefore make do with what we have and see that we improve on our sectors as we get along…

By: Sheku Putka Kamara

In our September publication of our Expo Magazine, I looked into an article that touched on fans’ love for football and how the sport has unified and is still unifying stakeholders. I intend to build on such gains and delve further into a commitment into the very discipline that many people adore. When perspectives of this nature are put together, it is not to say that there are no issues and or vices, but the urge to get things done and establish progress tend to outshine the negativities.

Globally, billions go into sports. Even here, those millions are now very visible even if not physically. That is a way to suggest that sporting disciplines and investments plus funds go hand in hand.  Sierra Leone has had its share of successes and challenges in the sporting sector. It is not a secret that football is by far the most popular sport, but that is not to suggest that other sporting disciplines are not existing. For example, volleyball, basketball, athletics are all forms of sport that have tasted and are still tasting successes. This goes to show that even where we do not have it all, we have been making progress in our own little ways.

Nicol and Sesay (2002) discussed that ‘Sierra Leoneans are avid football (soccer) fans, and prior to the civil war, the country boasted dozens of amateur and semi-professional squads that vied for national honours. Baseball and basketball are also popular, and several Sierra Leone-born athletes play professionally outside the country.’ They continued that ‘Intramural competition in all these sports was brought to a standstill during the civil war. In 1996, the national football squad reached the final rounds of the African Nations’ Cup after barely avoiding forfeiture because of a lack of travel funds. In 1999, the team had to surrender its play-off spot in the 2000 African Nations’ Cup because it could not safely travel to neighbouring Guinea to play in a qualifying match.

After the end of the civil war, efforts were made to reestablish the national football program in the country.’ So, even history has it that we have come a long way. In fact, there are perspectives that hold the view that much of what we could boast of today could be traced as far back.

In present day Sierra Leone, much may not have changed, but we may as well have a few pointers as explained by David Turner, a young sports’ administrator in Freetown who serves as head of media for the Western Area Football Association (WAFA). To him, the ‘stable peace among football stakeholders’ could be regarded as a major success story. He said that from ‘2013 to 2021, there was several rancour between and among the football family under the Madam Isha Johansen leadership, but that since Thomas Daddy Brima took over, ‘he has brought sanity within the game,’ Turner said. He added that in international competitions, youth football competitions across the various categories have been organized by the Football Association. Sierra Leone male and female teams have participated in FIFA and CAF Competitions. The construction of Artificial Turf in Freetown, Lungi and Bo is another laudable venture. When completed, this project will aid in boosting the sector and equally create an opportunity for young and aspiring sportsmen to do more and even better. Again, the playing of the SL Premier League is another virtue. We all know that football is serious business and so if we are able to make some of these things happen, we deserve a tap on the back.

Football is that game that has brought together divergent views and a range of persons. In summary, they all speak with one voice. A man will leave Calaba Town, East Freetown to relax at the Parade Field to view a premier league match, just as how a sport-loving fan will leave Lumley, West Freetown, to go to the BrimaAtouga mini stadium to witness a premier league encounter. That is how much the game has brought people to go and so it is worth noting that we all should do that which is to be done to make the game bigger and better.

Like how I touched on fans’ love in my previous article, the adoration that comes with and for the players in the game of football is sometimes unexplainable. Observation will guarantee that people are doing these things ‘for the love of the game.’

Turner also touched on the training of Licence B coaches and the refreshers’ course for Referees. He also said that the fact that the football sector is currently implementing the FIFA connect programs which will enable local teams to avoid illegal transfer of players is another plus. Mark you, this has been an aged old problem.

So, solving same would be prudent. With all of these opportunities for growth and what have you, there are challenges. David said that the ‘Lack of Branding and Marketing Opportunities by premier league clubs, Poor referees’ officiatingand Lack of trained and experienced football administrators’ are some of the challenges. This is so explainable even without adding a few other lines. This calls for more investment in the sector. It means that we all have to do more.

Again, efforts have to be made to recruit the right persons. It matters!  Like I would always note and state, we do not have it all. We still have a long way to go, but we are to be mindful that there are little

Things that we all could do. We should equally be hopeful that the processes have to be trusted and that some things are actually gradual.

With those traits in mind, there is nothing we cannot accomplish. It’s all about the mindset. It’s about the belief that things are doable and achievable. When we get that right, all other things may fall just in place, but if we are to miss the targets in those earlier stages, all other things may just not work correctly. Football and sports are big and huge globally.
Let’s therefore make do with what we have and see that we improve on our sectors as we get along…

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